Oh, that they would!

1 Samuel 12:24 Only fear the LORD, and serve him in truth with all your heart: for consider how great things he hath done for you.

He has been good to me in all my needs, trials, struggles, and sorrows. Never could there be a better Master, for his service is freedom, his rule is love. The ancient saints proved him to be a good Master, and each of them rejoiced to sing, “I am thy servant, O Lord!” I will bear this witness before my friends and neighbors, for possibly they may be led by my testimony to seek my Lord Jesus as their Master. Oh that they would do so! They would never repent so wise a deed. If they would but take his easy yoke, they would find themselves in so royal a service that they would enlist in it forever.
– C. H. Spurgeon

The Miracle of Belief

My speech and my preaching were not with persuasive words of human wisdom . . . ―1 Corinthians 2:4

In My Utmost for His Highest Oswald Chambers wrote:
“Paul was a scholar and an orator of the highest degree; he was not speaking here out of a deep sense of humility, but was saying that when he preached the gospel, he would veil the power of God if he impressed people with the excellency of his speech. Belief in Jesus is a miracle produced only by the effectiveness of redemption, not by impressive speech, nor by wooing and persuading, but only by the sheer unaided power of God. The creative power of redemption comes through the preaching of the gospel, but never because of the personality of the preacher.”

Preachers of old, along the lines of Whitefield, Spurgeon, and Wesley, some of the greatest of the past few centuries, took this very literally. Most often their sermons were written out word-for-word and delivered in a monotone voice. The results of what our generation would likely call boring presentation? Huge revivals with untold numbers being saved. Most assuredly the message not the messenger is what holds the key to salvation.

From the Heart

In commenting on Psalm 45 (http://is.gd/dqrDD) Charles Spurgeon wrote:

“Whereby they have made thee glad.” And who are thus privileged to make the Saviour glad? His Church his people. But is it possible? He makes us glad, but how can we make him glad? By our love. See, loving heart, how he delights in you. When you lean your head on his bosom, you not only receive, but you give him joy; when you gaze with love upon his all-glorious face, you not only obtain comfort, but impart delight. Our praise, too, gives him joy not the song of the lips alone, but the melody of the heart’s deep gratitude. He loves us, not for the value of what we give, but for the motive from which the gift springs.

Often we forget that our Lord looks at the intent of the heart in all matters, not only sin but also praise and worship. Ours need not always be a grand expression of our love to Him; the smallest gesture, the quiet whisper, the silent prayer, if they come from the heart with the attitude of love are just as pleasing to God as any other way we might praise Him.

No Care

Be careful for nothing; but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God. And the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus
Philippians 4:6-7

“No care, but all prayer. No anxiety, but much joyful communion with God. Carry your desires to the Lord of your life, the guardian of your soul. Go to Him with two portions of prayer, and one of fragrant praise. Do not pray doubtfully, but thankfully. Consider that you have your petitions, and, therefore, thank God for His Grace.” – C. H. Spurgeon

Saints Gone On

This past week my grandfather would have turned 80 years old. He, however, is no longer with us but has gone on to be with the Lord and the saints that departed before him, including my grandmother. I don’t know about you, but at certain times, anniversaries, birthdays, and other holidays for example, I think more about just where these loved ones are, what they are doing and how blessedly happy they mist be. Today in my reading I found a piece written by Charles Spurgeon that gives a pretty nice idea of just how much better off they are than we. Let me share that writing with you:

“The saints in Jesus, when their bodies sleep in peace, have perpetual fellowship with him – ay, better fellowship than we can enjoy. We have but the transitory glimpse of his face; they gaze upon it every moment. We see him “in a glass, darkly;” they behold him “face to face.” We sip of the brook by the way; they plunge into the very ocean of unbounded love. We look up sometimes, and see our Father smile; look whenever they may, his face is always full of smiles for them. We get some drops of comfort; but they get the honeycomb itself. They are full of peace, full of joy forever. They “sleep in Jesus.””.

In my mind’s eye that is such a wonderful depiction of where those saints are now. And as wondrous as this image is, to me anyway, I know where they are and what they are experiencing is far better than that (Isa. 64:4; 1 Cor. 2:9).

2 Cor. 5:6-8

6 Therefore we are always confident, knowing that, whilst we are at home in the body, we are absent from the Lord:

7 (For we walk by faith, not by sight:)

8 We are confident, I say, and willing rather to be absent from the body, and to be present with the Lord.

Charles Spurgeon – Daily Help

If we had the blessings without asking for them, we should think them common things; but prayer makes the common pebbles of God’s temporal bounties more precious than diamonds; and spiritual prayer cuts the diamond, and makes it glisten more. When thou art wrestling, like Jacob with the angel, and art nearly thrown down, ask the Holy Spirit to nerve thine arm. Consider how the Holy Spirit is the chariot-wheel of prayer. Prayer may be the chariot, the desire may draw it forth, but the Spirit is the very wheel whereby it moveth.

Tears Shall Cease

Tears Shall Cease

And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes. (Revelation 21:4)

Yes, we shall come to this if we are believers. Sorrow shalt cease, and tears shall be wiped away. This is the world of weeping, but it passes away. There shall be a new heaven and a new earth, so says the first verse of this chapter; and therefore there will be nothing to weep over concerning the fall and its consequent miseries. Read the second verse and note how it speaks of the bride and her marriage. The Lamb’s wedding is a time for boundless pleasure, and tears would be out of place. The third verse says that God Himself will dwell among men; and surely at His right hand there are pleasures forevermore, and tears can no longer flow.

What will our state be when there will be no more sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain? This will be more glorious than we can as yet imagine. O eyes that are red with weeping, cease your scalding flow, for in a little while ye shall know no more tears! None can wipe tears away like the God of love, but He is coming to do it. “Weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning.” Come, Lord, and tarry not; for now both men and women must weep!

-C.H. Spurgeon